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In: Business and Management

Submitted By fm708
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Science Studies 2/2006

A Gendered Economy of Pleasure: Representations of Cars and Humans in Motoring Magazines
Catharina Landström

This paper analyses cultural signification in the co-production of gender and technology. Focusing on the popular genre of motoring magazines, it discerns a pattern organising men and women in opposite relations to cars. Men’s relationships with cars are premised on passion and pleasure while women are figured as rational and unable to attach emotionally to cars. This “gendered economy of pleasure” is traced in a close reading of motoring magazine representations of cars and humans. Further, a DVD representation of the Volvo YCC, a concept car developed by women for an imagined female user, is discussed in relation to this semiotic pattern. The paper is conceptual, texts are interpreted in order to bring forward aspects of meaning-making that are not immediately obvious. The objective is to critically illuminate one aspect of the cultural production of the car as a masculine technology. Keywords: cars, gender, pleasure

This paper suggests a way in which to think about the cultural construction of the car as a masculine technology. Interpreting representations in motoring magazines, it traces a “gendered economy of pleasure” that organises the symbolical meanings of relationships between humans and cars. The objective is to contribute a critical perspective on cultural meaning-making to the feminist interrogation of the co-production of gender and technology. The symbolical association of cars
Science Studies, Vol. 19(2006) No.2, 31–53

with men and masculinity is a cultural phenomenon in conflict with everyday experience. Women and men all over the world drive, buy, take care of and love cars. Women and men in cars violate laws and social norms, they speed, drive drunk and get road rage. In spite of this, the car continues…...

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Biodiesel in Brazil

...de 26/01/11 Nº 420, de 12/07/2010 DOU de 13/07/10 Nº 13, de 12/01/2009 DOU de 13/01/09 ABDIESEL ABDIESEL ADM AGRENCO AGROPALMA AMAZONBIO ARAGUASSÚ BARRALCOOL BEIRA RIO BIANCHINI BIG FRANGO BINATURAL BIO BRAZILIAN ITALIAN OIL BIO ÓLEO BIO PETRO BIO VIDA BIOBRAX BIOCAMP BIOCAPITAL Araguari Varginha Rondonópolis Alto Araguaia Belém Jí Paraná Porto Alegre do Norte Barra dos Bugres Terra Nova do Norte Canoas Rolândia Formosa Barra do Garças Cuiabá Araraquara Várzea Grande Una Campo Verde Charqueada MG MG MT MT PA RO MT MT MT RS PR GO MT MT SP MT BA MT SP 07.443.010/0001-40 07.443.010/0002-21 02.003.402/0024-61 08.614.267/0002-61 83.663.484/0001-86 08.794.451/0001-50 04.111.111/0001-26 33.664.228/0001-35 08.802.246/0001-99 87.548.020/0002-60 76.743.764/0001-39 07.113.559/0001-77 08.429.269/0001-08 08.387.930/0001-51 07.156.116/0001-63 08.772.264/0001-75 07.545.774/0003-09 08.094.915/0001-15 07.814.533/0001-56 2,40 1.352 660 80 90 100 190,46 12 900 6 450 98 10 194,44 18 98 300 824 3 AGÊNCIA NACIONAL DO PETRÓLEO, GÁS NATURAL E BIOCOMBUSTÍVEIS SUPERINTENDÊNCIA DE REFINO E PROCESSAMENTO DE GÁS NATURAL – SRP BOLETIM MENSAL DE BIODIESEL FEVEREIRO DE 2012 Capacidade autorizada (m3/dia) 1 30 Autorizações Vigentes Autorização para Autorização para Operação Comercialização Nº 360, de 02/09/2008 DOU 03/09/08 Nº 66, de 09/02/2011 DOU de 10/02/11 Nº 365, de 09/09/2008 DOU 10/09/08 Nº 127, de 21/06/2007 DOU de 22/06/07......

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