1963

In: Historical Events

Submitted By jrimmer
Words 555
Pages 3
The year of 1963 was not only a gruesome, dark year for the U.S. but it was a pivotal point in Civil Rights Movement. I know it’s hard to believe that America was in a horrible state then it is now but it’s true. For example can you believe that segregation was a common thing back then? Matter of fact in January Governor of Alabama, George Wallace, delivered a speech that segregation was something that was needed for the nation. Shortly a couple of months after civil rights activist took to the streets to protest but that turned into one of the most horrific scenes in our nation history. They were viciously attacked by dogs and sustain by fire hoses. A few weeks after this there was a small incident at University of Alabama were two black students were not accepted in by Gov. Wallace but he was overruled by President John F. Kennedy. He also gave a speech that same night saying he was going to present a civil rights bill to the Congress. Just as things were looking for Civil Rights Movement one of their infamous and one of their major leaders, Medgar Evers, was murdered outside his Mississippi home by the KKK that same night. But on August 28, 1963 the whole world would change as we know it because on this day Martin Luther King Dr. delivered the famous “I Have A Dream” speech at the March on Washington. This is probably one of most influential speeches ever given in American History. Just as things were looking like they were about to change for good, church bombs begin to happen Alabama. Dozens were injured and four little girls were killed and if this wasn't sad enough President John F. Kennedy was assassinated later that year.
This unfair and cruel society were one race succeed the other was perfectly depicted in King’s “I Have A Dream Speech”. In the beginning he tells the audience how black people are still in the same predicament they were in hundreds of…...

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