Balance of Advantages of the Uk Joining the Emu and/or Using the Euro as a Functional Currency

In: Business and Management

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University of Aberdeen

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Balance of advantages of the UK joining the EMU and/or using the Euro as a functional currency.

Contents

Contents 2 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3 2. INTRODUCTION 3 2.1. HISTORY OF INSOMNIA PLC 3 2.2. SCOPE OF BUSINESS 3 2.3. CURRENT EXPOSURES 4 2.3.1. TRANSACTION EXPOSURE 4 2.3.2. ECONOMIC EXPOSURE 4 2.3.3. TRANSLATION EXPOSURE 4 2.4. HEDGING 5 3. EFFECTS OF UK JOINING EMU ON INSOMNIA PLC 5 3.1. COST SAVINGS ON CROSS-BORDER TRANSACTIONS 5 3.2. STABILITY OF PRICES 6 3.3. PRICE TRANSPARENCY 6 3.4. OTHER EFFECTS 6 4. USING EURO AS A FUNCTIONAL CURRENCY OF INSOMNIA PLC 7 5. CONCLUSION 8 6. BIBLIOGRAPHY 9

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
It has been found that UK joining EMU as well as accepting the Euro as a functional currency will bring more benefits to Insomnia plc than staying outside of the Economic and Monetary Union or continuing using Pound Sterling as a functional currency. Both of the choices will decrease the currency exchange rate fluctuation risk which was found to be the most significant to the company. Analysis were based mainly on academic articles, European Central Bank (ECB) publishing’s, and International Accounting Standards (IASs). 2. INTRODUCTION
“The Economic and Monetary Union is an agreement between participating European nations to share a single currency, the Euro and a single economic policy with set conditions of fiscal responsibility. There are currently 27 member-states of varying degrees of integration with the EMU” (EU4Journalists)
Currently there are 16 member states who adopted the Euro: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovenia,…...

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