Case Study: Greenheart and the Quest for Corporate Environmental Sustainability

In: Business and Management

Submitted By herman168
Words 2560
Pages 11
Running head: CASE STUDY ON GREENHEART

Case Study: Greenheart and the Quest for Corporate Environmental Sustainability

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University

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April 12, 2012

Abstract

Greenheart has greatly reduced in promoting environmental sustainability after a change of ownership and some financial difficulties brought by the environment. With this, its leader should remember that the greatest promoter of power is people. By increasing the number of internal stakeholders and supporting their coordinators, the company can again revive their lost power and ambiance and bring back again the gains and the resources that were once lost.

Case Study: Greenheart and the Quest for Corporate Environmental Sustainability

Introduction
Greenheart is a multinational food producer stated in Netherlands since 1900s. It has long sought environmental sustainability through ample means of reducing its environmental impact. However, with the change of ownership and some economic difficulties, environmental issues became merely of secondary importance, taking them more in a structured, integrative, and “realist” basis. The new owner had a singular approach and would rather focus more on the marketing issues, with some shifts in corporate values and corporate mission statement. After 2002, the vision statement no longer mentioned the environment but rather the initiative to be a world leader in the food industry by creating quality products for long-term sustainability. By this, Greenheart has taken a major shift in its corporate vision and mission, while experiencing some important relevant issues because of the changes that have taken place over the years.
This paper centers on the case of Greenheart and its quest for corporate environmental sustainability. It shall reveal three important…...

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