Case Study - the Chinese Market

In: Business and Management

Submitted By hamzashaukat1
Words 1371
Pages 6
The learning objectives of the case are to (1) understand the link between supply chain structure and financial performance, (2) identify key drivers of supply chain performance and how they affect a firm's ability to respond during periods of strong or weak demand, and (3) develop the alignment between supply chain structure and strategic position for a firm.

To this end, the case highlights the supply chain structures and performances of three firms in the diamond retailing industry: Blue Nile, Zales, and Tiffany. Blue Nile’s supply chain structure is geared toward a pure centralized e-business; Zales sells merchandise primarily through stores but recently added an online channel; and Tiffany also uses an online channel but most of its diamond and other high-end products are sold through stores. The case is designed to foster discussion of the three supply chain structures and encourage students to evaluate the firms’ performance in terms of components of customer service such as response time, product variety, product availability, customer experience, order visibility, and returnability, coupled with cost factors that include inventory, transportation, information, and facilities.

3. Given that Tiffany stores have thrived with their focus on selling high-end jewelry, what do you think of the failure of Zales with its upscale strategy in 2006?

Zales’s upscale strategy was in response to fierce competition it was facing from mass merchant department stores such as Wal-Mart, national chain department stores such as JCPenney, and home shopping networks. Middle America had been Zales’s target market since its founding in 1924. A large portion of the company’s revenue came from value-oriented customers who frequented malls. The success of the Zales brand was built on the perception of the good value one got for the money, but with that came the…...

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