Economic Grip

In: Social Issues

Submitted By agalangtz
Words 372
Pages 2
Questions Chapter VII 1. Should the United States seek to tighten the economic grip on Cuba? If so, why?
The relationship between United States and Cuba deteriorated when the us corporations in Cuba were nationalized during the Cuban Revolution, since then the United States has declined to do business with Cuba. In my opinion the US should open his market and stop the embargo to Cuba because it will open many opportunities and break a lot of barriers between the countries.

2. Should the United States normalize business relations with Cuba? If so, should the United States stipulate any conditions?
Yes they should normalize business because that would give opportunities to US corporation to sell their products in that country and therefore the economy of both countries will improve, in my opinion the condition that best suits the US should be that Cuba returns all the companies to the US companies.

3. Assume you are Cuba's leader. What kind of trade relationship with the United States would be in your best interest? What type would you be willing to accept?
If I were Raul Castro I would try to reconcile with the US because that would mean breaking trade barriers between the countries and a dramatically improvement in exports of their main products (Sugar Caine, Rum and Cigars). Also tourism will improve making Cuba an attractive destination to US citizens.

4. How does the structure and relationships of the U.S, political system influence the existence and specification of the trade embargo?
The political system of the United States practice democracy and the Cuban practice Communism for that reason the US imposed the embargo on Cuba to overthrow the communist regime and for Cuba to respect Human Rights.

5. Much U.S. tourism, especially via cruise ships, goes to the Caribbean. Do you think that the end of U.S. travel restrictions to Cuba will add or…...

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