Emotions, Serotonin and the Limbic System

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Submitted By adam12
Words 2599
Pages 11
Running head: EMOTION: SEROTONIN, AND LIMBIC SYSTEM 1

Emotions: The roles of serotonin, and limbic system

Melissa

University

EMOTION: SEROTONIN, AND LIMBIC SYSTEM 2

Abstract

This report will review how emotions control our behavior; focusing on serotonin physiology, and the role of the Limbic System. I will report the role of serotonin and physiological changes in the body affecting the emotions of an individual, as well as other symptoms that will be dully noted in the report such as depression. The Limbic System controls the physiological changes which affect impulse control, anger and aggression, among other emotions and behaviors—I will summarize the relation between activity and several disorders. Studies have been done to understand serotonin and physiology in humans, and medications that can increase serotonin activity to offset negative affects (Hariri and Brown, 2006, p. 12). This report will summarize the details of how serotonin, and how the Limbic System affects human behaviors.

EMOTION: SEROTONIN, AND LIMBIC SYSTEM 3

Emotions: The roles of serotonin, and limbic system

Emotions are generally defined as a state of mind that may reflect joy or fear, although, emotions also consist of patterns of physiological responses that lead to specific behaviors, which is what this paper will reflect. Specifically, the physiological responses of behavior are a direct reflection of how serotonin and the various areas of the Limbic System affect an individual. Imbalances of one or all three of these may constitute negative emotions such as fear, antisocial disorder, anger, poor impulse control, aggression, and depression. Research will show that emotions are not just a state of mind, but that behaviors are…...

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