Entrepreneurship and Small Business a Case of a Developing Country

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS
A CASE OF A DEVELOPING COUNTRY

Abstract
This study revolve around the socio-economic structure of entrepreneurship, factors affecting the growth and development of enterprises and problems faced by them. For the purpose of data collection a sample of fifty small scale units was taken and a common schedule of structure questionnaire containing questions of various aspect of entrepreneurship was administered personally to the owner/managing director of each of the units as the case may be.
This study is partially exploratory but basically descriptive in nature. From the interpretation and analysis of data collected the result shows that age is not a static phenomenon for entrepreneurship. Those who have less education but have more practical experience and training, enter into the industry early. However, in such cases less education restricts the growth and development of the enterprise. The paper also finds reasons for enterpreneurship, the three was to earn high profits and prosperity. The variables which decide the area of activity or the product line are based on assured market, parental business, experience and revival of the sick unit etc. There are certain irritants that also serve as impediments for the growth of enterprises. For instance competition from small scale units, (28%) financial constraints, high intent ratio and others.

Introductionn
The prosperity and progress of a nation depends on the quality of its people. If they are enterprising, ambitious and courageous enough to bear the risk, the community/society will develop quickly. Such people are identified as entrepreneurs and their character reflects entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship is no monopoly of any religion or community, Business Timus (1995) entrepreneurial potential can be found and developed anywhere irrespective of age, qualification,…...

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