Experiment: Scientific Measurements

In: Science

Submitted By DarkenedAzure
Words 700
Pages 3
Experiment 1: Scientific Measurements
Class: 1250 Section # 20933
Christopher Brown
Joe Castle
January 10, 2013
January 17, 2013

Purpose
The purpose of this lab is to learn how correctly use an analytical and top-loading balance, as well as finding the density using different glassware measurement tools. Aside from this another purpose is to learn about accuracy and precision in data.
Procedure
Please refer to Chemistry 1250 General Chemistry Laboratory Manual, Fall 2012-Summer 2013, Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Hayden McNeil, Experiment , pages 5, for the proper procedure.
Data
See attached sheet
Sample Calculations
Actual Density
Density(g/cm3)= -0.00030 g℃∙cm3x 24℃(Room Temp)+1.0042gcm3 = 0.997g/mL
Measured Density (Buret 5mL )
Density= 5.0624g5.00mL (Mass/Volume)= 1.01 g/mL
1 Error (Buret 5mL)
Measured Density – Actual Density
1.01g/mL – 0.997g/mL= 0.013g/mL
Relative Error (Buret 5mL)
1 Error/Actual Density
(0.013g/mL) / 0.997g/mL = 0.013 (after sig figs)
The % Error(Buret 5mL)
Relative Error x 100
0.013 x 100=1.3%
Graphs
See attached sheets

Results and Discussion The results of the experiment as shown in my data, show that the glasswares that measure to a longer decimal point tends to be more precise when compared to glasswares that only measure whole integers. For example, according to the data attached, the Buret seems to be the most accurate of all the glasswares. This can be seen on the table on its Error1 and the Percent Error. The Buret had the least amount of Error percentage compared to other glasswares. At the same time, the Beaker was the most precise (after incorporating significant figures). This can be seen when looking at the Beaker’s Measured Density and it’s Percent Error. In the Beaker’s Measured Density there is a continuous “0.9 g/mL” reading. In it’s Percent Error it has a…...

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