: Explain How Culture and Socialisation Interact in a Sociological Context.

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Teaching Period 3, 2013 SLSS102 Explorations in Sociology
Assessment 1: Minor essay Word limit: 1000 (+/- 10%) Due date: 9am AEDT Monday 2 December (Week 5) Weighting: 20%

Assessment details Write a 1000-word essay on one of the following topics:

TOPIC 1: Which is more important in shaping individual identity: social structure or social interaction?

TOPIC 2: Explain how culture and socialisation interact in a sociological context.

In your essay you should: • • • • • Demonstrate your understanding of themes covered so far in this unit. Use the three texts listed in the resources box (right) to answer your selected question. In addition you should use a minimum of TWO references to augment the material in these texts. Support your discussions with examples from the social world. Use correct Harvard referencing style.

Essay resources To answer your chosen topic, use: Your eText: Sociology: a down to earth approach (Possamai & Possamai-Indesedy 2011). The following eBooks: • • Plummer, K 2010, Sociology: the basics, Taylor & Francis e-library. Back, L, Bennett, A, Edles, L,Gibson, M, Inglis, D, Jacobs, R, Woodward, I 2012 Cultural sociology: an introduction, Wiley.

To augment the material in these texts you may use other sociology textbooks, articles from the Swinburne library database and current media articles.

1
SLSS102 Explorations in Sociology

Assessment criteria Your essay should clearly address the question and include relevant ideas addressed in the unit and from your knowledge and experience. Your work will be assessed using the following marking guide:
Criteria No pass Pass 50-64%
Reference to relevant readings and resources (30%) Did not meet criteria. The amount and level of research undertaken in the preparation of this work is adequate. The work evidences adequate understanding of the basic issues relevant to the topic. Evidence…...

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