Farm Households and Wage Labour in the Northeastern Maritimes in the Early 19th Century

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GEO 2IO3: GIS and Digital Cartography

Exercise 4: Tables and Layouts

Tania Shamo #0368839 Lab 2: Tues

TA: Rebecca

Tuesday, March 21, 2006 1) The projection used is Lambert Conformal Conic. 2) The primary key for the HIUs theme TABLE is Cdname. 3) The level of measurement for HIUs is nominal. 4) The choice of symbolization for the data shown on my map is default. This is because the information on the map only differentiates between five different regions. Therefore, the colours chosen have no significant importance but the colours help to distinguish the order of the HIU’s and their location area. 5)
[pic]
6) Using the one-to-one relationship was necessary instead of a many-to-one relationship because there was only one tuple in the origin that is related to one tuple in the destination.

7) HIU is the primary key for HEART.DBF.

8)
[pic]
9) The map shown above was projected as a Lambert Conformal Conic. I used a graduated colour scheme to show the different rates of heart disease in certain regions of Ontario; the darkest colours show where the rates of heat disease are the highest. The colours also show which districts have extreme cases and which areas are above the average of the rest of Ontario. The classification used was landscape neat line, this is because this type of classification is best used for an east-west map.

10) The projection that underlies the STATE PLANE 1983 is coordinate system Lambert Conformal Conic.
11) The formula that was used in step D for calculating the rate was SIDS/BIRTH*1000.
12) Mean=2.05 Standard Deviation=1.57 Min. Value=0.00 Max. Value=9.55

13)
[pic]

14) The map of North Carolina shown above was projected as a Lambert Conformal Conic. I used a graduated colour scheme to show the different…...

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