Financial Regulatory Reform

In: Business and Management

Submitted By marcyslaw
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Financial Regulatory Reform ECO 238 12/07/2009 “Over the past two years, we have faced the most severe financial crisis since the Great Depression. The financial system failed to perform its function as a reducer and distributor of risk. Instead, it magnified risks, precipitating an economic contraction that has hurt families and businesses around the world.” (Geithner & Summers) While the current crisis had many causes, it is clear that the government could have done more to prevent many of the problems from growing out of control and threatening the stability of our financial system. Gaps and weaknesses in the management and regulation of financial firms presented challenges to our government’s ability to monitor, prevent, or address risks as they built up in the system, which caused the enormous bailouts or the massive financial collapses of financial institutions. The previous approaches to bank holding company regulation focused on protecting the subsidiary bank, not on the comprehensive regulation of the whole firm. In June, the President, proposed a new financial regulatory plan for the financial system. The new reform, as mentioned by the President, would protect consumers, impose new restraints on financial institutions and guard against the dismal practices that caused the market crisis. The new reform would generally be adopted by regulators since it mostly affects them. Timothy Geithner who is the secretary of the Treasury and Lawrence Summers who is the director of the National Economic Council wrote that “the goal is to create a more stable regulatory regime that is flexible and effective; that is able to secure the benefits of financial innovation while guarding the system against its own excess.” The proposed reform had five main objectives. They were: to promote strong supervision and regulation of financial firms, to establish a…...

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