First Wave of Feminism

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Submitted By jess1221
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The first-wave of feminism, which is also known as “The Suffragettes”, began in the United Kingdom and the United States around the nineteenth century and lasted until the early twentieth century (Writer, M. 2007). This wave was centered around women wanting to denounce gender inequalities and demand the right to vote, therefore making them official citizens. However it is important to recognise that in Australia aboriginal women were not among those who were granted the right to vote and become involved in political activity (Seibert, A & Roslaniec, D. 1998). The wave formally began at the Secna Falls Convention in 1848, which is where the first women’s rights convention in history was held (Lewis, J. 2001). In 1840, two women; Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stranton were attending a convention in London as delegates with their husbands. It was here that the credentials committee ruled that women were “constitutionally unfit for public business meetings.” (Lewis, J. 2001). The men were permitted to speak, the women were not and there was a curtain that separated the women from the men in the building (Lewis, J. 2001). These two women decided to hold a mass meeting to address the rights of women, which over 300 women and men attended on the first day to rally to the cause of equality for women. Elizabeth Cady Stanton drafted the Seneca Falls Declaration outlining the new movement's ideology and political strategies (Rampton, Martha. 2008). This was only the beginning of women rallying together to make a difference and equalize rights. Discussions about the vote and women's participation in politics led to an examination of the differences between men and women as they were then viewed. Some claimed that women were morally superior to men, and so their presence in the civic sphere would improve public behavior and the political process (Rampton, M.…...

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