Gauss

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Melody Lane
Professor Dent
Math 104
9/2/2013

Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss

Carl Friedrich Gauss is known as the "Prince of Mathematics," before the age of tender of three, Carl genius was first discovered by his parents when he calculative ability to correct his father's arithmetic. Carl Gauss was born in 1777 in Brunswick, Germany. His revolutionary nature was demonstrated at age twelve, when he began questioning the axioms of Euclid. Gauss also continued his education at the age of 14 with the help of the Duke of Brunswick, Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand he began attending College. His genius was confirmed at the age of 19 when he proved that the regular n-gon was constructible if n is the product of distinct prime Fermat numbers although his parents already discovered his intelligent gift.. Also at age 19, he proved Fermat's conjecture that every number is the sum of three triangle numbers. At age 24 Gauss published his first book Disquisitiones Arithmeticae, which is considered one of the greatest books of pure mathematics ever. Gauss is also considered at the greatest theorem proven ever. “Several important theorems and lemmas bear his name; he was first to produce a complete proof of Euclid's Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic; and first to produce a rigorous proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra Gauss himself used "Fundamental Theorem" to refer to Euler's Law of Quadratic Reciprocity. Gauss built the theory of complex numbers into its modern form, including the notion of "monogenic" functions which are now ubiquitous in mathematical physics.“(http://www.math.wichita.edu/history/men/gauss.html) Gauss developed the arithmetic of congruences and became the premier number theoretician of all time. Other contributions of Gauss include working in several areas of physics, and the invention of a heliotrope.

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