Global Wine Wars 2009: New World Versus Old World

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Rainmaker
Words 2128
Pages 9
Case Study: Online Marketing at Big Skinny
Background
Big Skinny is the company behind the “world thinnest wallet.” They have a cool brand and a product that customers love once they have seen the benefits. Their wallet technology appeals to customers for two primary reasons, the size & weight. Heavier and thicker wallets are more difficult to carry; they may not fit in your pocket and generally cause discomfort to carry. Carrying a very thick wallet in one’s back pocket can also cause back problems with associated posture issues from sitting on the offending item for long periods. Big Skinny also promotes additional benefits from standard skinny wallets including the ability to secure items due to the rubber coating on the interior, and the durability to machine wash their wallets without causing damage.
Big Skinny’ initial success was a result of the products and sales approach. They were able to develop a cool brand and engage directly with customers at fairs & festivals. This in-person selling technique enabled them to articulate the key features of their product in a way that customers understood, but the sales model was not sufficiently scalable to allow them to grow as fast as they wanted. However the direct approach was still effective to promote the brand, connect with the consumers, and gather their feedback for use in wider efforts.
Their move to mass-market promotion was started with print advertising (billboards, postcards, & newspaper/ magazine ads) in key regional markets to increase brand exposure. These efforts created incremental success but did not generate enough demand to achieve the success they desired. The costs and management overhead to scale this off-line marketing campaign to a wider audience was prohibitive and an online strategy was seen as the path forward.

Who Wants A Wallet?
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