Horror Fiction

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Submitted By neen908
Words 307
Pages 2
Nina Ciccotelli
Horror Fiction

Horror fiction was created to make readers afraid of what they are reading and what was going to happen next. Horror fiction is most definitely used in mostly all of Edgar Allen Poe’s stories. A great example of when I saw horror fiction was in the Black Cat. Whenever he began to cut his cats eyes out with a pocket knife or a pen or some sort, that was a horrifying site to imagine. The cat loved him, but he snapped and the cat was his first victim. Shortly after that, he killed his wife because she tried to stop the horrible thing he was doing to his cat. These things are horrifying to even think about being done to the people and things you love. Example of horror fiction was from the movie Super 8. Whenever that train crashed, and that monster came around as a result, strange things began to happen. I would say they were pretty horrifying. People in their little town began to disappear and nobody knew why. They later found out it was because of this monster. But nobody could figure out how to get rid of it or when it was going to strike next. That was the horrifying part, not knowing. I personally have never read anything that deals with horror fiction for a few reasons. I do not enjoy being scared. So I try to read happy things! I’m typically a nervous person. But what horror fiction means to me is not knowing what horrible thing is going to happen next in a story. Or maybe, who is going to come after you next? Kind of like my earlier examples of Poe and Super 8. Horror fiction will most definitely keep readers on their toes at all times because of its frightening story…...

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