How Important Is the Inspector

In: English and Literature

Submitted By joedadomo
Words 758
Pages 4
Inspector Goole has an incredibly important role in ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J.B. Priestly. He is a persistent person with a strong character which allows him to take control of all of the actions of the other characters and the development of the play.
Firstly, the Inspector is clearly important because his name is in the title. ‘An Inspector Calls’. Only the most important of character have their names in the title of the play. Priestly wishes to convey the importance of the Inspector before the play has begun.
The Inspector arrives in the middle of Birling’s speech in the first Act. He informs the Birlings that a girl called Eva Smith has committed suicide. He says Eva’s diary names members of the Birling family. ‘A girl has died in the infirmary’. Suddenly the whole story changes, from it being a joyful celebration of an engagement into an interrogation. This shows his importance because he has changed the mood of the whole house simply by entering.
The Inspector, when interrogating Sheila, makes her feel guilty by repeating everything for more emphases ‘You used the power you had to punish a girl just because she made you feel like that’ Sheila admits that she only conspired to get Eva fired because she was a ‘pretty working-class woman’. The Inspector has made Sheila confess that she has a jealous and spiteful side. The Inspector therefore was important in this instance because he made Sheila reveal a part of her character and forced her into recognising the error of her ways.
The Inspector then reveals that Eva was also known as Daisy Renton, which triggers Gerald acting differently. Gerald admits that he met her in a theatre bar and installed her as his mistress. Sheila thanks him for speaking the truth but calls the engagement off. ‘She gives him the ring’. This shows the Inspector’s importance because the reason that all the characters were at the…...

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