Hubris

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Stonewall
Words 1014
Pages 5
Guidelines for Article Reviews *MGNT 7330*, *Spring ‘*10 Student identification:

Citation: Kroll, M.J., Toombs, L.A., & Wright, P. 2000. Napoleon’s tragic march home from Moscow. Academy of Management Executive, Vol. 14 (1): pp. 117-127.

Theoretical framework: The authors of this article believe that hubris comes from four major sources which feed into the individual and if the person is weak to the hype generated by their success that they will fall victim to hubris and the implications it brings. The four sources of hubris that the article discusses are narcissism, series of successes, uncritical successes of accolades, and an exemption from the rules. The three implications that are a result of a hubris person are their confidence turns to arrogance; they rely on a simplistic formula for success, and a failure to face challenging realities. The relationship between the major variables in the article can be seen in figure one. {draw:frame} Major contribution(s): This article makes a comparison between the mindset of modern corporate leadership and the activities of Napoleon Bonaparte during the early 1800’s campaign of domination of Europe. Napoleon rose through the ranks of the French Army to become the highest ranking officer and declared himself emperor through a belief that the rules did not apply to him and anything he attempted to do would be successful. The article goes into detail about his conquest of Europe and his unsuccessful attempt to conquer Russia even though his military advisors told him his plan would fail. The article draws comparative situations from the mid to late 1900’s where leaders of major corporations believed in their continued success so much that they did not listen to their advisors nor did they believe that they could fail. The companies that the article lists show the same mindset as Napoleon and the penalties…...

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