Indian Economy

In: Business and Management

Submitted By babulreddy
Words 414
Pages 2
Applications of Operations Research planning, routing, scheduling, forecasting, process analysis and decision analysis. OR is also contributing greatly to healthcare services such as surgical and bed scheduling, portering operations, emergency transport, accident trend analysis and treatment optimization. In the service sector, OR techniques have been found especially helpful when dealing with variability in service delivery such as call centres, queues for service and medical wait times. A sampler of typical OR applications includes: • • • • • • • • • • • • Optimization of LTL trucking (Yellow Freight) Optimal package designs (Domtar Packaging, Ltd) Manpower planning models (Treasury Board Secretariat) Aircraft operations (Delta Airlines) Surgical bed optimization (Fraser Health Authority) Pre-board passenger screening (Vancouver International Airport ) Switching network studies (Bell-Northern Research, Ltd) Maintenance Strategies for the US Coast Guard Revenue Management (American Airlines) Resource allocation in a mental health hospital (Douglas Hospital) Routing of Waste Trucks (Waste Management Inc.) Rail Car Optimization (CP Rail) Successful OR applications can be found in a broad array of industries dealing with challenges such as

OR has been applied in many industry sectors including the following: Transport and Travel. OR techniques are used by airlines and rail companies to offer varying fares and make higher revenues by filling more seats at different prices - an OR technique known as Yield Management. All airlines depend on the effective use of OR techniques to make them operate at a profit. Retailing. In supermarkets, data from store loyalty card schemes is analyzed by OR groups to advise on merchandising policies and profitability improvement. OR methods are also used to decide when and where new store developments should be made. Health. Hospital…...

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