Irish Identity and Religious Diversity

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By jlmk
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INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY:
Assignment Submission Form

Student Name: | Jessica McKeon | Student ID Number: | 12302812 | Programme Title: | Business, Economic and Social Studies | Module Title: | Introduction to Sociology | Assessment Title: | To what extent does the new religious diversity in Ireland challenge traditional definitions of Irish national identity? | Lecturer(s): | Daniel FaasAnna Siuda (TA) | Date Submitted: | 13/12/12 |

I have read and I understand the plagiarism provisions contained in the General Regulations of the University Calendar found at: http://www.tcd.ie/calendar/assets/pdf/tcd-calendar-h-regulations.pdf I declare that the assignment being submitted represents my own work and has not been taken from the work of others save where appropriately referenced in the body of the assignment.

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This essay explores the extent to which new religious diversity in Ireland challenges traditional definitions of Irish national identity. National identity can be defined as the cultural outcome of a discourse of the nation. This concept of national identity exists for a number of reasons. It gives us a sense of collective belonging, it decides who should be allowed become a full citizen of the nation, and it influences the goals of a nation that are thought to be in the collective social interest (O’Mahony et al, 2001). Irish national identity used to depend on Catholicism. Although predominantly Roman Catholic, Ireland today is a multi-cultural society where all religions are embraced and respected as playing vital roles in the societal make-up of the country (educationireland.ie). The first impression when religious beliefs and practice in Ireland are compared with those in Europe as a whole is that Ireland remains an outstandingly Catholic country (Fogarty et al, 1984). While it is true that the vast majority…...

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