Literary Heritage Poetry

In: English and Literature

Submitted By kamauney
Words 969
Pages 4
Interesting Renditions Each change that is contributed to an authentic piece is critically analyzed and in some cases frowned upon, but sometimes the writer creates a better work than that of the original piece. Also in some cases, the authentic piece is favored over the rendition. These accusations can be true for several reasons like; one favors the original writer or the singer better, the period-of-time the work was created was significant to a person, the person likes the style of the writer or singer better, or maybe he or she just likes the authentic or rendition version itself better for no exact reason. There are several examples where this exists. A specific poetic example of when the original is considered better than the rendition is, “Shall I Compare Thee To a Summer’s Day,” by William Shakespeare recreated by Howard Moss and a specific example of when the rendition of a song is considered better than the original is, “I love Rock N’ Roll,” by The Arrows covered by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts. Both of these authentic works are classics and are still popular today. When comparing them to their renditions, beauty, style and rhythm play an important role and can conclude why one is favored over the other. “Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day?” by William Shakespeare is considered to be one of his most popular sonnets, number 18 out of the 154 sonnets he wrote. This poem stands out from the others because of the comparison that is made of a young beautiful girl or boy to a summers day. For example, when Shakespeare says, “Thou art more lovely and more temperate” (line 2), he is comparing, as listed above, a young, beautiful human being to the season of summer and saying that he or she is more delightful. Another important aspect that adds beauty to Shakespeare’s sonnet is the rhythm that it portrays as the reader views the poem. This is because…...

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