Literature N the Xix Century

In: English and Literature

Submitted By lucianagrand
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Literature
In the early 19th century, a number of American authors began to create literature emphasizing native scenes and characters.

Prior to the 19th Century, the United States consisted of a series of colonies which remained dependant to the British Empire. After being successful at rebelling against the British Empire in the last half of the 18th Century and the Civil War of 1812, the United States has never been the same//was no longer the same.
New ways of thinking were starting to be considered by American society as the rise of industry and science introduced many modifications in the way people lived. Concerning the field of literature, its origins in the United States were so far inherently related to British history and cultural lore. However, in the early 19th Century, American writers started to express their perceptions, ideas and experiences while being under the influence of fresh feelings of independence which forged the nation’s sense of identity. Therefore, the literature produced in this time was distinctively characterized by emphasizing native scenes and characters. Many authors contributed to this area of art:

four authors of very respectable stature appeared. William Cullen Bryant, Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, and Edgar Allan Poe initiated a great half century of literary development.

The authors who began to come to prominence in the 1830s and were active until about the end of the Civil War—the humorists, the classic New Englanders, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, and others—did their work in a new spirit, and their achievements were of a new sort. In part this was because they were in some way influenced by the broadening democratic concepts that in 1829 triumphed in Andrew Jackson’s inauguration as president. In part it was because, in this Romantic period of emphasis upon native scenes and characters…...

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