Math 211

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Math 211
Corazon J. Lullegao MAEd-Mathematics July 27, 2013
JOURNAL 1
Why Teach Mathematics?

Mathematics plays an important role to real life. As one saying goes “Life started from erection to resurrection “. The quotation simply implies that life started when God planned someone to have life until He want it back to Him. Mathematics evolves with life. When life exists, math also starts. This the reason why we should teach mathematics.

As the couple live together, they may plan to have or not to have yet a child. Taking into consideration their biological capabilities of having a child. They may also opt to have a male or a female offspring by natural method. This plan can be realize through natural family planning. We know the fact that this natural method is the safe method and relates to a woman’s fertility. According to one recent study, if the conception happened before the peak of the fertility of a woman, there is a big chance of having a baby boy while if the conception is after the peak of fertility, expect for a baby girl. Looking back into the phenomena, mathematics is very much involved.

As the baby meets the world, parents look into the baby’s physical and health development. As the baby starts to utter words, parents were excited to let the child say one, two and many more. The parents at home start teaching the child to reason out, learn to count and learn some basic skills to deal with life.

In school, we enhance and develop that basic learning. We teachers as agent of learning much be equipped with math. A simple assessment of learning needs math. We must take into consideration that we cannot give for what we do not have. We must teach every learner how to deal with life. We will teach them the process how to make complicated things to become simple. We must teach them how reason out,…...

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