Mining in Australia

In: Business and Management

Submitted By haryodanurwindu
Words 1625
Pages 7
Mining for controversy
Date January 29, 2013

* http://www.smh.com.au/business/mining-for-controversy-20130128-2dgul.html *

Farmer Phil Laird at the Maules Creek mine near Boggabri in New South Wales. Photo: Dallas Kilponen HAVING battled an environmental activist, a volatile coal baron and soft coal markets, Whitehaven Coal is more determined than ever to build its controversial Maules Creek mine near Boggabri.
If finally approved, as expected imminently, the project will double annual production for Whitehaven, the largest coalminer in the New South Wales Gunnedah Basin.
The Maules Creek project, within the Leard State Forest, has been on and off the agenda for decades. Rio Tinto forerunner CRA got state approval for a combination of underground and open-cut mining in 1990, and Coal and Allied started work on a dam in 1995. The project, along with two other mines in the same forest, has been approved by the NSW Planning Assessment Commission and is waiting only for approval from federal Environment Minister Tony Burke, based partly on his assessment of the impact on threatened species and partly on advice from the new Independent Expert Scientific Committee established at the behest of the independent Tony Windsor, to consider the cumulative effects of large coal and coal seam gas projects, particularly on water.

Anti-coalmine protester Jonathan Moylan. Photo: Peter Lorimer
An announcement on all three coal projects - the other two being expansions of Whitehaven's own Tarrawonga mine, and its Boggabri joint venture with Japan's Idemitsu - could come as soon as Thursday.

Front Line Action on Coal activist Jonathan Moylan caused a national outcry earlier this month when - from his camp in the Leard forest - he issued a fake ANZ press release purporting to withdraw a $1.2 billion loan to finance Maules Creek on corporate responsibility…...

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