Oms Littlefield Case

In: Business and Management

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Fall 2009 OMS 551 Final Examination

Answer Document Cover Sheet
Please complete the information indicated and include this page with your submission

Name: ___________ ID#____________

Date Exam Taken ________ Start Time________

End Time _________
Secret Code _________ 2.5 hours allowed!
Secret Code Please enter a 4-8 number/letter string that I can use for posting grade information. Use last 4 digits of ID # if you can’t think of anything else.
Submissions: Return your answer document to me in one of these ways: • email to jerics@umich.edu (preferred), with attached answer files named as follows: surname*** where *** is anything you want—just be sure to start with your surname! • fax to 734-764-2555, Hand-carry to office Ross 4478 • Place in mailfolder SVAAN in Facilities Office area, Evening MBA section • hardcopy regular or express mail to Eric Svaan Ross 4478 701 Tappan Ann Arbor MI 48109-1234

• Due Date 17 December 2009

|Part |Name |Max Pts |Points Earned |
|1. |Project Analysis |25 | |
|2. |Supply Chains in Hard Times |74 | |
|3. |Narayana Hospital |50 | |
| | | | |
| |Total |149 |…...

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