Physics 2 Lab 1

In: Science

Submitted By brcoop
Words 793
Pages 4
Go to http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sims.php?sim=Electric_Field_Hockey

and click on Run Now.

1. You rub balloons in your hair and then hang them like in the picture below. Explain why you think they move apart and what might affect how far apart they get.

- It is electricity that is causing this to happen. All matter is composed of atoms and atoms are the smallest particles of that particular element. The atoms are composed of subatomic particles (protons, neutrons, electrons). Protons and neutrons are found inside of the nucleus while the electrons are found outside of the nucleus and occupy different energy levels depending on their distance from the nucleus. When charged particles come near one another, they give rise to two different forces. Force can pull objects apart or push them together. This is the force of attraction. Negatively charged electrons are attracted to positively charged protons. So when a balloon is rubbed on your hair then hung on the wall one loses electrons while the other gains electrons. When placed on the wall the balloon polarizes the charges in the wall, electrons in the wall nearest to the negative charged balloon move away, leaving the area of the wall positively charged.

-What affects how far apart the get is the strength of the electric field around the objects. The electric field is strongest near the charged particle and weakest far away from the charged particle.

2. Test your ideas using Electric Field Hockey in the Practice mode. Make a table to record your observations about what affects the direction and speed of the puck. Your table should demonstrate that you have run controlled tests with all the variables.

# of Protons Mass of Neutron Goal Information
3 25 Moved very quickly into the goal.
2 60 Moved slower into the goal because of more mass
1 100 Moved slowly into the goal…...

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