Poetry Analysis Shall I Comepare Thee (Sonnet 18) by William Shakespeare

In: English and Literature

Submitted By VilliamPP
Words 475
Pages 2
Poetry analysis
Shall I Comepare Thee (Sonnet 18)
By William Shakespeare
Before William Shakespeare died, he managed to write 154 sonnets Out of all 154 sonnets the most famous and well-known is Sonnet 18, which this paper is going to be about. Because the sonnets written by William Shakespeare, was so beloved, all of Shakespeare’s sonnet-heritage is being called Shakespearean sonnets.
There are different indicators that, helps to define a sonnet. First of all ‘Shall I Comepare Thee’ consists of fourteen lines, where the eight first lines called the octave presents which aspects the poem will regard. The last six lines called the sestet gives a personal view of what the poem really is about.
‘Shall I Comepare Thee’ is divided by three quatrains followed by a couplet and has the traditional characteristic rhyme scheme of a Shakespearean sonnet: abab cdcd efef gg.
The metrical aspect of sonnet 18 is that the poem got written in iambic form with one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable. The sonnet has five feet in each line and therefore it is under pentameter. For example if the 2 first lines in Sonnet 18 should be divided into the rhythm of five in stressed and unstressed syllables it would look like this:
The stressed syllables, is the ‘green’ ones and unstressed syllables is the ‘red’ ones.
Shall I - compare - thee to - a sum - mer’s day?
Thou art - more love - ly and - more tem - perate.
Shakespeare starts the poem with the question ‘shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?’
What actually is an actual and evident question. Shakespeare’s poem, Is about a girl, which is more lovely than summer due to the fact that she has no flaws. Through the poem William Shakespeare presents various flaws that summer has, like rough winds and also in the lines 4 & 5: ‘And summer's lease hath all too short a date’ which means the…...

Similar Documents

Sonnet 18 vs. Sonnet 75

...give the subject matter as well as the poet immortality. In this paper I will demonstrate how poets reinforce my claim through their poems. Sonnet 75 by Edmund Spenser as well as sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare "eternal lines" (l.9) employs the theme of immortality. The poet tries to achieve immortality for his lover. In the sonnets, both personas state that their lover will be immortal" So long lives this, and this gives life to thee" (l.14). Both sonnets convey a message that even though the poet writes the sonnet the subject matter immortality is in the hands of external force; the readers/ auditors "so long as men can breath or eyes can see"(l.13). Both personas in the sonnets argue that the poet's creative ability comes amounts to writing the sonnet but unable to make the sonnet immortal. By reading the sonnet and therefore immortalizing it the by past of it is making the poet Yosfan 2 immortal as well. Understanding there immortality relay in the hands of the readers/auditors, both personas try their best to charm and reach out to the readers/auditors. Sonnet 75 as well as sonnet 18 displays a dialogue that discusses the issue of immortality. While sonnet 18 describes the persona's internal debate on how is the best way to immortalize his beautiful lover, sonnet 75 by Spenser, reproduces an internal debate, conversation, between the persona and his lady. The dialog in sonnet 75 is no more than a literary convention, an artifice that......

Words: 1086 - Pages: 5

3 Sonnets by Shakespeare

...A Sonnet 17 by William Shakespeare Who will believe my verse in time to come If it were filled with your most high deserts? Though yet heav'n knows it is but as a tomb Which hides your life and shows not half your parts. If I could write the beauty of your eyes And in fresh numbers number all your graces, The age to come would say, “This poet lies— Such heavenly touches ne'er touched earthly faces.” So should my papers, yellowed with their age, Be scorned, like old men of less truth than tongue, And your true rights be termed a poet’s rage And stretchèd meter of an ántique song;   But were some child of yours alive that time,   You should live twice: in it and in my rhyme. B Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature’s changing course untrimmed. But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st, Nor shall death brag thou wand’rest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st.   So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,   So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. C Sonnet 29 by William Shakespeare When in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes I all alone beweep my outcast......

Words: 371 - Pages: 2

Sonnet 18

...|Sonnet 18 | | | | | |by William Shakespeare | | |Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? |often as Death Rough shall too lines fair | |Thou art more lovely and more temperate: |or is his that and eye to life too | |Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, |can summer's shake sometime breathe, Sometime thee thou buds | |And summer's lease hath all too short a date: |summer's | |Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, |Nor do often compare in more eternal see, shade, wander'st I | |And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; |fade, or date: | |And every fair from fair sometime declines, |growest; thee. wander'st winds growest; | |By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd; |see, can nature's eternal lives more ...

Words: 447 - Pages: 2

Sonnet 18 Shakespeare

...In "Sonnet 18" by Shakespeare the speaker poses a question to himself as to how to best immortalize his beloved subject. At first he compares his love to a summer's day, which the speaker sees as most beautiful. However, he finds the metaphor imperfect so he decides through internal debate and poetic expression that the best way to immortalize his love is through his own poetry. This method eternalizes both his love for her and her beauty in written words. By exploring the contrast between the subject's beauty and a summer's day, the author proves that love can withstand the course of time. The line "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day" (1) opens the speaker's debate with a comparison between his love and the season of summer; the author questions whether the beloved subject should be compared to a summer's day. In the consequent lines, the narrators begins to compare his subject to a "summer's day" and answer the question posed in line one, and right away makes the point that the subject is superior to summer, with the line "thou art more lovely and more temperate" (2). The faults of summer continue to be proven with phrases such as "rough winds" which describe summer's temporary nature. Unlike summer, "rough winds" do not shake the subject's beauty .The examples made regarding summer in the first quatrain show that summer's beauty does not last forever, it is merely a time of year that passes within a short period of time . Each subsequent comparison between his......

Words: 677 - Pages: 3

Literary Heritage Poetry

...she just likes the authentic or rendition version itself better for no exact reason. There are several examples where this exists. A specific poetic example of when the original is considered better than the rendition is, “Shall I Compare Thee To a Summer’s Day,” by William Shakespeare recreated by Howard Moss and a specific example of when the rendition of a song is considered better than the original is, “I love Rock N’ Roll,” by The Arrows covered by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts. Both of these authentic works are classics and are still popular today. When comparing them to their renditions, beauty, style and rhythm play an important role and can conclude why one is favored over the other. “Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day?” by William Shakespeare is considered to be one of his most popular sonnets, number 18 out of the 154 sonnets he wrote. This poem stands out from the others because of the comparison that is made of a young beautiful girl or boy to a summers day. For example, when Shakespeare says, “Thou art more lovely and more temperate” (line 2), he is comparing, as listed above, a young, beautiful human being to the season of summer and saying that he or she is more delightful. Another important aspect that adds beauty to Shakespeare’s sonnet is the rhythm that it portrays as the reader views the poem. This is because Shakespeare’s word choice and sentence structure create an easier flow from line to line. In the poem, each word has a specific meaning and......

Words: 969 - Pages: 4

William Shakespeare

...Education Training Department General Santos City A TERM PAPER On THE LEGACY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement in English IV S.Y. 2012-2013 Submitted to: MR. JUDY L. BALDEMOR, MaEd Submitted by: MICHELLE P. BERDONAR The Legacy of William Shakespeare Shakespeare, William (1564-1616), was an English playwright and poet. He is generally considered as the greatest dramatist the world has ever known and the finest poet who has written in the English language. Shakespeare has also been the world’s most popular author. No writer’s play have been produced so many times or read widely in so many countries. Scholars have written thousands of books and articles about his plots, characters, themes, and language. As a matter of fact, almost four hundred years after Shakespeare’s death there are 157 million referring him on Google. He began a successful life in London. Shakespeare’s profession was acting. He is listed in documents of 1592, 1598 and 1603 as an actor. Some of us know that he acted in a Ben Johnson play and also in his own plays, but its thought that he is a very busy man, writing, managing the theatre, and commuting between London and Stratford, where his family was, he didn’t undertake big roles. There are evidences that he played the ghost in Hamlet and Adam in As You Like It. Being the most famous writer in the world, Shakespeare left us neither journals nor letters- he left us only poems and his plays.......

Words: 2780 - Pages: 12

Sonnet 15, 18, 29

...SONNET 18 | PARAPHRASE | Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? | Shall I compare you to a summer's day? | Thou art more lovely and more temperate. | You are more beautiful and gentle. | Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, | Stormy winds will shake the May flowers, | And summer's lease hath all too short a date. | and summer lasts for too short of a time. | Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, | Sometimes the sun is too hot, | And often is his gold complexion dimm'd, | and many times it is overcast, | And every fair from fair sometime declines, | and everything beautiful eventually decays, | By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd. | either by some unforseen circumstance, or nature's course. | But thy eternal summer shall not fade | But your beauty will never fade | Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest, | or lose its inherent loveliness, | Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, | even Death will not be able to claim you, | When in eternal lines to time thou growest. | when in my eternal poetry you will grow. | So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, | As long as there are people who see and breathe, | So long lives this and this gives life to thee. | this will live and give you life. | SONNET 29 | PARAPHRASE | When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, | When I’ve fallen out of favor with fortune and men, | I all alone beweep my outcast state | All alone I weep over my position as a social......

Words: 2710 - Pages: 11

Sonnet 18

...Sonnet 18 Sonnet 18 is the best known and most well-loved of all 154 sonnets. It is also one of the most straightforward in language and intent. The stability of love and its power to immortalize the subject of the poet's verse is the theme. SUMMARY The poet starts the praise of the beloved without ostentation, but he slowly builds the image of his friend into that of a perfect being. The speaker opens the poem with a question addressed to the beloved: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” The next eleven lines are devoted to such a comparison the beloved is first compared to summer in the octave, but, at the start of the third quatrain (9), she is summer, and thus, she is metamorphosed into the standard by which true beauty can and should be judged. The final quatrain of the sonnet tells how the beloved differs from the summer in that respect: his beauty will last forever (“Thy eternal summer shall not fade...”) and never die as poet's only answer to such profound joy and beauty is to ensure that his friend be forever in human memory, saved from the oblivion that accompanies death. He achieves this through his verse, believing that, as history writes itself, his friend will become one with time. The final couplet reaffirms the poet's hope that as long as there is breath in mankind, his poetry too will live on, and ensure the immortality of his muse. Commentary On the surface, the poem is simply a statement of praise about the beauty of the beloved; summer tends to...

Words: 546 - Pages: 3

Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare

...English: poem analysis Compare in detail two or three poems by different poets, discussing the structure and form of each work. Give some idea of the importance of the structure in evaluating the meaning and impact of the poems. In the poem Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare and Mending Wall by Robert Frost the structure and form of the poems show the significant role on evaluating and highlighting the meaning of time. The two poems are formed completely different in the way the techniques and structure were used but they convey the similar hidden meaning. As one of the characteristic of the usual Shakespearean Sonnets, Sonnet 18 formed as fourteen lines of iambic pentameter with a varied rhyme scheme. It contains 3 quatrains which state the problem leading to the couplet which expresses the theme of the sonnet and presents the solution. Unlike other Shakespearean sonnets, this sonnet is quite easier and understandable than other sonnets because the way he structured the sonnet is simple. At the first glance, the poem simply gives us the idea that how Shakespeare describes his lover by comparing ‘thee’ as summer’s day. Basically, the first quatrain shows the features of summer that followed by the first line of the poem “shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” After this line, the poet stated the features of summer until line 7. 7th line explains how the summer’s day beauty will fade away by the changing of time and the 8th line stated that thee’s eternal summer......

Words: 921 - Pages: 4

William

...liamGet quotes daily Join Goodreads Shakespeare's Sonnets Quotes ------------------------------------------------- Top of Form Bottom of Form ------------------------------------------------- Top of Form Bottom of Form ------------------------------------------------- Top of Form Bottom of Form Rate this book 1 of 5 stars2 of 5 stars3 of 5 stars4 of 5 stars5 of 5 stars Shakespeare's Sonnets by William Shakespeare 50,445 ratings, 4.23 average rating, 557 reviews Shakespeare's Sonnets Quotes (showing 1-30 of 72) “Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometimes too hot the eye of heaven shines, And too often is his gold complexion dimm'd: And every fair from fair sometimes declines, By chance or natures changing course untrimm'd; By thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee.” ― William Shakespeare, Shakespeare's Sonnets tags: love, shakespeare, youth 1092 likes Like “Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove. O no, it is an ever-fixed mark That looks on tempests and is never shaken; It is the star to every wand'ring......

Words: 4598 - Pages: 19

Sonnet 18 and Sonnet 75

...Amoretti : Sonnet 75 This poem is written in beginning modern English. Edmund Spenser uses some dutch words in his poem, like strand (now: beach). Here we have somebody who writes the name of the person he loves on the beach, because he wants the world to know he's in love. It's not clever because when the tide comes, the waves will wash it away. In poetry they use metaphor. An example : “you are like a red rose”, a red rose is a metaphor for beauty. Line 1-2: ‘’One day I wrote her name upon the strand, but came the waves and washed it away.’’ The speaker and his love are at the beach (strand) and the speaker is in a romantic mood, because he writes her name in the sand. The waves wash the name away. Line 3: “Again I wrote it with a second hand,” The speaker writes the name again. Second hand is the same as again. The line needs to be complete and he had already used “again”. Line 4 : “But came the tide, and made my pains his prey.” Tides: the periodic variation in the surface level of oceans. The tides are a metaphor for life and death, often used by poets, because it´s one of the cententies of life. The tide is presented as a predator. His pains (efforts) are the prey of the waves. Death is also a predator, the tides are life and death. Line 5-6: ‘’Vain man, said she, that doest in vain assay, a mortel thing so to immortalize.’’ Vain has two meanings here, Vain (man) = you think too highly of yourself. Vain (assay) = useless (try). It´s......

Words: 1443 - Pages: 6

Sonnet 18 Analysis

...Sonnet 18 Shakespeare In "Sonnet 18" by Shakespeare the speaker poses a question to himself as to how to best immortalize his beloved subject. At first he compares his love to a summer's day, which the speaker sees as most beautiful. However, he finds the metaphor imperfect so he decides through internal debate and poetic expression that the best way to immortalize his love is through his own poetry. This method eternalizes both his love for her and her beauty in written words. By exploring the contrast between the subject's beauty and a summer's day, the author proves that love can withstand the course of time. The line "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day" (1) opens the speaker's debate with a comparison between his love and the season of summer; the author questions whether the beloved subject should be compared to a summer's day. In the consequent lines, the narrators begins to compare his subject to a "summer's day" and answer the question posed in line one, and right away makes the point that the subject is superior to summer, with the line "thou art more lovely and more temperate" (2). The faults of summer continue to be proven with phrases such as "rough winds" which describe summer's temporary nature. Unlike summer, "rough winds" do not shake the subject's beauty .The examples made regarding summer in the first quatrain show that summer's beauty does not last forever, it is merely a time of year that passes within a short period of time . Each......

Words: 346 - Pages: 2

Shakespeare

...SHAKESPEARE’S SONNETS GRADUATE: SCIENTIFIC COORDINATOR: -2016- Important aspects about William Shakespeare William Shakespeare, English dramatist and poet He is considered the greatest writer of the English language literature of all time The first one (until approximately 1598) belongs to a series of pieces in which youth girded Shakespeare’s current fashions, adapting issues to public taste In the second Shakespearean stage, which runs from 1598-1604, are located the pieces often called "middle works", characterized by a higher stage virtuosity Dramas Julius Caesar, Hamlet and Othello announce the next period, known as the great tragedies (1604-1608), in which Shakespeare delves into the deepest feelings of the human being The final phase (1608-1611) shines his latest masterpiece, The Tempest, in which fantasy and reality intermingle offering a testimony of wisdom and acceptance of death. •Human vision (caught in the passion play); •Relationship with the company and provided genius; •Nature, love and art - universal ways of saving time and evil attack. Sonnets give the feeling and eventually even convince the reader to visit a temple and understands that the priest officiating the ritual union between text and reading is a creature with a special expertise whereof modern poetry can not even have the feeble idea ANALYSIS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S MOST REPRESENTATIVES SONNETS Critics argue that the sonnets are......

Words: 2285 - Pages: 10

Shakespearian Poetry - a Comparison Between Sonnets Xviii & Cxxx

...Many artists discover their love for art and the effect it has on people at a very young age, as did Shakespeare, as his poems reflect that he may have started writing as early as the age of 18 years old. His early sonnets are immature when compared to his later ones. Shakespeare’s use of nature imagery is clearly apparent in all his sonnets, but his use of nature imagery and its quality changes drastically. As his use of nature imagery changes, the tone of the sonnets also transforms, turning from being light-hearted and beautiful to dark and somewhat grotesque. More importantly, his definition of love itself takes on a different shape, going from physical attraction to a truer love. Finally, his allusions to religion become much more specific and more directed to the person he is writing about. Clearly Shakespeare’s poetry matures with time and is reflected by his definition of love and how differently it is expressed in Sonnet XVIII compared to Sonnet CXXX. In Sonnet XVIII, Shakespeare focuses on nature imagery to describe his young love. “…Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date: Sometimes too hot the eye of heaven shines…” He begins by comparing the love to a summer’s day, but says she is more beautiful. He refers to summer being too short and the sun, at times, shining too brightly and making the day too hot, but other times the sun may be blocked by clouds completely. All of......

Words: 1634 - Pages: 7

Sonnet 18 Analysis

...Eternal Beauty In Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 18”, the narrator employs an extended metaphor when comparing the addressee to a “summer’s day”. The metaphor is emphasized by the tone shift in line nine, and the comparison is finalized by a couplet that expands on the theme of immortality. The sonnet makes it clear that the individual’s beauty and vigor cannot be compared to commonplace nature and that the individual is something more than human. Sonnet 18 is part of the group of sonnets that is written to address men. In this particular one, Shakespeare compares the man’s beauty to that of nature, particularly a day in the summer. The first quatrain begins the extended metaphor by implying that the man being addressed has all the qualities of a summer’s day. This immediately associates the man with the sun and all of its qualities: he is strong, bright, and full of energy. However, by writing: “Though art more lovely and more temperate,” in line two, Shakespeare illustrates the fact that although the best thing nature has to offer, a summer’s day is far from perfect. The first shift happens in line three; the narrator stops talking about the man and begins pointing out the imperfections of summer. He employs vivid imagery to argue that summer’s beauty is hurt by “rough winds” and its “lease hath all too short a date,” (4). Shakespeare also adds that summer may sometimes be too hot, and other times its “gold complexion [is] dimm’d,” (5). This emphasizes the qualities of the man;......

Words: 603 - Pages: 3

Anne of Green Gables Fire and Dew | Calendar Builder | Чёрная Пантера