Preparation of Waste Leather Polymer Composite

In: Science

Submitted By leriad1987
Words 437
Pages 2
Highlight on My Research Background
Overview : Polymeric Composite has emerged as a new technology for innovation of new materials with low cost, high durability, more effectiveness, moreover reduction of environmental pollution. Leather industry is one of the highly environmental pollution creating industry. Solid wastes are being generated from the tanneries 88 metric tons/day on an average basis in my country, Bangladesh.
In my research work I have attempted to reuse, recycle the leather waste. Moreover the aim is to reduce the environmental pollution.
My research work was conducted to make bioapplicable materials from polyester resin reinforced with scrap leather fiber. The resulting polymer composite has been named “Leather Plastic”. One of the most important objectives of my research work is to use natural leather fiber which is biodegradable. So a definite amount of polyester resin could be replaced by natural fiber, which is very important to our environment.
Manufacturing process: The composite was prepared by Wet Layup method. Leather fiber was treated with Unsaturated Polyester Resin and then fabricated and characterized. The matrix was prepared by mixing Unsaturated Polyester Resin with Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) solution. The grinded leather fiber was used as the reinforcement. After mixing the matrix with the reinforcement, peroxide was used as a radical initiator to induce polymerizations. After curing period the mechanical properties of the composite was characterized.
Test performed on Leather Plastic: Tensile Strength, Elongation, Young's modulus, Izod Impact Strength , Bending strength , Water uptake, Soil Test, DMA test, DTA-TGA test, SEM analysis, Ultrasound effect, Cobalt-60 gamma Radiation effect. Instruments: I have good skill on computer and Modern Sophisticated Analytical Instruments such as Electro-chemical Analyzer, Scanning Electron…...

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