Private Education in Rural India: Status and Opportunity

In: Social Issues

Submitted By kripalniranjan
Words 1131
Pages 5
Topic
School Education - Private Participation for Educating Rural India
Title of the Project
Private Education in Rural India: Status and Opportunity

Kripal Singh Niranjan,

Private Education in Rural India: Status and Opportunity
I. Introduction: World Bank statistics found that fewer than 40 percent of adolescents in Rural
India attend secondary schools. The Economist reports that half of 10-year-old rural children could not read at a basic level, over 60% were unable to do division, and half dropped out by the age 14.

According to this criterion, the 2011 census holds the National Literacy Rate to be around
74%.Government statistics of 2001 also hold that the rate of increase in literacy is more in rural areas than in urban areas, so we need to focus on rural areas and special attention goes to female education because it is still less than male literacy rate.

Private Education in India: According to current estimates, 70% Population of India lives in rural area, making the government the major provider of education. However, because of poor quality of public education, 27% of Indian children are privately educated. According to some research, private schools often provide superior results at a fraction of the unit cost of government schools. However, others have suggested that private schools fail to provide education to the poorest families. Most of the private schools provide central board education not state board to maintain their quality.

In their favour, it has been pointed out that private schools cover the entire curriculum and offer extra-curricular activities such as science fairs, general knowledge, sports, music and drama. The pupil teacher ratios are much better in private schools than government scho ols in rural areas.
The competition in the school market is intense, yet most schools make profit. Even the poorest…...

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