Rock Climbers Perception of Responsible Tourism in Waterval Boven

In: Other Topics

Submitted By brawilliam
Words 18829
Pages 76
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 INTRODUCTION Tourism is, according to the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (2002a), the world’s largest economical sector. In 2002, tourism in South African had a growth rate of 11.1 % in foreign arrivals from the previous year. That accounted for 6,4 million foreign tourists (South African Tourism, 2003). In 2003 it grew with another 1.2 % to 6,5 million tourists (South African Tourism, 2004), and in 2004, the number had increased to more than 6,8 million foreign tourists that visited South Africa (Geldenhuys, 2005:10). This shows that South Africa is becoming a popular travel destination among tourists.

South Africa is a diverse country with many unique cultures and historical significances. South African Tourism have established that tourists experienced the hospitality and friendliness of the South African people as the most satisfactory of their visit in South Africa (Geldenhuys, 2005:10), and in a recent international survey done by American Express (Geldenhuys, 2005:10), South Africa was rated as the second-cheapest destination. Attractions such as Table Mountain, Robben Island, the Garden Route, Namaqualand, the Cradle of Human Kind, the Kruger National Park, the Drakensberg Mountains, and Soweto are just some of the South African examples (South African Tourism, 2005a). The towns and cities of South Africa such as Durban, Johannesburg, Port Elizabeth, and Cape Town also serve as attractions (South African Tourism, 2005b). There are also various small towns that are popular among tourists (South African 1

Tourist, 2005c). They normally have significant historical, cultural, or natural attractions that are of value to tourists. Towns such as Knysna, Oudtshoorn, Franschoek, Darling, Groot Marico, Dullstroom, Pilgrim’s Rest, Clarens, Simonstown, Paternoster, Kaapchehoop, Matjiesfontein and Waterval Boven are…...

Similar Documents

Eco Tourism

...An essay on ecotourism Ecotourism Essay Ecotourism involves responsible traveling to fragile, pristine and mostly protected areas. This takes place for different purposes, from educating the traveler, fostering respect for different cultures to directly benefiting the economic and political empowerment of local communities (Garana, 2008). Ideally, ecotourism incorporates the following criteria; promote biological and cultural diversity, touring unspoiled natural habitats, and the main attractions being local culture, flora and fauna. In short, ecotourism operations are defined by their commitment to the environment, education, nature and culture. The main objectives of ecotourism are providing nature-based, environmental education experiences for visitors and managing this in a sustainable manner (Badan & Bhatt, 2005). Education enables students to understand the interconnectedness of various aspects of the global environment. Ecotourism embraces cooperative education which is a structured educational strategy that integrates class work with learning through productive fieldwork experiences that for practical applications to be realized. The relationship between ecotourism and education is majorly concerned with ensuring that agencies deliver effective interpretations of cultural, environmental and resource management values (Morgan, 1999). This type of education involves explanation, stimulation, provocation, revelation and understanding in an interesting and enjoyable......

Words: 2231 - Pages: 9

Dictionary of Travel, Tourism, and Hospitality

... Dictionary of Travel, Tourism and Hospitality By the same author Britain – Workshop or Service Centre to the World? The British Hotel and Catering Industry The Business of Hotels (with H. Ingram) Europeans on Holiday Higher Education and Research in Tourism in Western Europe Historical Development of Tourism (with A.J. Burkart) Holiday Surveys Examined The Management of Tourism (with A.J. Burkart eds) Managing Tourism (ed.) A Manual of Hotel Reception (with J.R.S. Beavis) Paying Guests Profile of the Hotel and Catering Industry (with D.W. Airey) Tourism and Hospitality in the 21st Century (with A. Lockwood eds) Tourism and Productivity Tourism Council of the South Pacific Corporate Plan Tourism Employment in Wales Tourism: Past, Present and Future (with A.J. Burkart) Trends in Tourism: World Experience and England’s Prospects Trends in World Tourism Understanding Tourism Your Manpower (with J. Denton) Dictionary of Travel, Tourism and Hospitality S. Medlik Third edition OXFORD AMSTERDAM BOSTON LONDON NEW YORK PARIS SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SINGAPORE SYDNEY TOKYO Butterworth-Heinemann An imprint of Elsevier Science Linacre House, Jordan Hill, Oxford OX2 8DP 200 Wheeler Road, Burlington MA 01803 First published 1993 Reprinted (with amendments) 1994 Second edition 1996 Third edition 2003 Copyright © 1993, 1996, 2003, S. Medlik. All rights reserved The right of S. Medlik to be identified as the author of this work has been......

Words: 133754 - Pages: 536

Rocks

...The Non-Obvious Problem: How the Indeterminate Nonobviousness Standard Produces Excessive Patent Grants Gregory Mandel∗ The dominant current perception in patent law is that the core requirement of nonobviousness is applied too leniently, resulting in a proliferation of patents on trivial inventions that actually retard technological innovation in the long run. This Article reveals that the common wisdom is only half correct. The nonobviousness standard is not too low, but both too high and too low. It is indeterminate. Three principal factors produce nonobviousness indeterminacy: a failure to identify the quantum of innovation necessary to satisfy the standard, a failure to define the baseline level of ordinary skill against which to measure an innovation, and the epistemic infeasibility of requiring a technologically lay decision maker to judge from the perspective of a more highly trained and educated person of ordinary skill in the art. This Article introduces a mathematical model of innovation and patenting to analyze the effects of nonobviousness indeterminacy. Based on the model, indeterminacy in nonobviousness decisions has several unexpected consequences. First, indeterminacy results in an excessive total number of patent grants, and in many patent grants on obvious inventions. Second, indeterminacy leads to too many patent applications on obvious inventions and too few applications on non-obvious inventions. ∗ Professor of Law, Temple University — Beasley School......

Words: 31121 - Pages: 125

'Boven Roc Rally 2011 – an Organizers Perspective.

...Just us staring high up against a feint crack system through a massive overhang with not a whole lot of psyche! The weeks leading up to the Rally one has to say, is often slightly stressful for us. There are logistical nightmares of getting people, food and music to the sleepy railway town of Waterval Boven on the edge of the Mpumalanga escarpment. Without going into the boring details of the comedies of errors that struck on the last hour, you know things are not going to plan when the tick list starts growing onto the next page instead of slowly diminishing as the master plan is supposed to unfold. Why on earth did I ever utter the thought: “Hey, let's pull a generator across the top of Baboon Buttress, light up the crags below and have some night climbing on the Friday!”? By mid Friday afternoon nothing more could go wrong. Some friends and volunteers were still out at the crags putting up the last fixed top anchors on routes for us. Everything was roughly in place and there was a distinct calmness over me and the atmosphere around Tranquiltas Adventure Farm. The quiet before the storm. The camp site had steadily filled up from early in the week but during the day most climbers bailed from work and were now milling about, pitching tents, putting tea on the pots or cracking an early drink to get into the swing of the weekend. After nine years I have to keep reminding myself that as an event organiser, you actually must not do a lot, except tell people what to do!......

Words: 1429 - Pages: 6

Tourism

...Airports……………..……………..……………..……… | | 05 | BOOM IN INDIAN AVIATION SECTOR……………..……………..… | | 06 | FALL IN AVIATION SECTOR……………..……………..……………..Global and local pressures……………..……………..……………..……Sector crisis……………..……………..……………..……………..……RBI asks banks to help debt-ridden aviation sector………………………..Cut Down of Staff……………..……………..……………..…………….. | | 07 | CIVIL AVIATION POLICY IN INDIA……………..……………..Private Sector Participation and the Civil Aviation Policy……………..Security……………..……………..……………..……………..……………Maintenance……………..……………..……………..……………..Consumer Demand in the industry……………..……………..……………..Growing the Market……………..……………..……………..……………..Other substitutes……………..……………..……………..……………..Low-fare Airlines……………..……………..……………..……………..Consumer Perception……………..……………..……………..…………….. | | 08 | FUTURE OF AVIATION INDUSTRY IN INDIA……………..Current scenario……………..……………..……………..……………..Growth of Indian Aviation industry……………..……………..……………..Market share of key players in the Indian aviation sector…………….. | | 09 | PLAYERS IN THE MARKET……………..……………..…………Air India : India’s Legacy Carrier ……………..……………..……………..Indian Airlines ……………..……………..……………..……………..…Jet Airways……………..……………..……………..……………..………Air Sahara……………..……………..……………..……………..………..Air Deccan………..……………..……………..……………..……………..Kingfisher………………………..……………..……………..……………..Go Air……………..……………..……………..……………..……………..Indigo……………..……………..……………..……………..…………….Paramount……………..……………..……………..……………..…………Spice jet……………..……………..……………..……………..…………Types of......

Words: 13630 - Pages: 55

Tourism

...approaches to value creation and value delivery in the industry. Aviation: Passenger airlines, cargo airlines, airports, aircraft manufacturers and suppliers, and aviation-related industries, such as aircraft maintenance Shipping: Shipping companies, ports and shipbuilding companies Public transportation: Railway, subway, public transport providers and transport equipment manufacturers Logistics: Logistics service providers, express companies and post Tourism: Tour operators, hotels and resorts Government: All government-led projects related to the above industries Some may wonder of the tourism industry is a success or failure; it ultimately rests on the ability to sell. A salesperson covers a wide range of positions from order taker to order getter responsible for relationship building. The nature of tourism sales ; sales personnel serve as the company personal link to customer and personal selling is the most expensive contact and communication tool used by the company. The salesperson representative in the tourism industry performs one or more of the following tasks for their companies such as Prospecting, Targeting, communicating, selling, servicing, information’s gathering, allocating, and maintain strategic partnership. Prospecting is when sales representatives find and cultivate new customers. Targeting is when a sales representative decide how to allocate their scarce time between prospect and customers. Communicating is when a sales representative......

Words: 732 - Pages: 3

Sustainability in Tourism

...SUSTAINABILITY IN TOURISM SUSTAINABLE TEA-HOUSE TREK IN MANASLU REGION OF NEPAL I. Table of contents I II. List of abbreviations II III. List of tables and Figures III 1. INTRODUCTION 4 1.1 A BRIEF INTRODUCTION OF MANASLU 5 1.2 THE TEA HOUSE PROJECT 6 2. Sustainability Model 8 2.1 Social: 8 2.2 Economic: 9 2.3 Environment: 9 3. THE TARGET GROUP 10 3.1 INVOLVEMENT OF THE LOCALS 11 3.2 TRAINING 11 3.3 PROPOSED MODULE 12 3.4 OUTCOME 15 4. SWOT ANALYSIS 16 IV. List of references VI II. List of abbreviations ITB Berlin Internationale Tourismus Börse Berlin. TRPAP Tourism for Rural Poverty Program WTM World Travel Market. WTO. World Trade Organization UNESCO United Nations Educational and Cultural Organization UNDP United Nations Educational Development Program UNWTO United Nations World Tourism Organization III. List of tables and Figures Figure. 1 Sustainable Model 8 Tab. 1 Training model and curricullum 12, 13 and 14 1. INTRODUCTION Bahadhur (2012) affirms that Nepal is a federal democratic nation that proudly lies in the Himalayas and which borders China and India from the North and South respectively, Nepal is a country that is landlocked but the beauty and the existence of its magnificent high Himalayas mountains and the diverse cultures and ethnic factions makes this country one of the mysterious countries for any foreign visitor.Christie (2008) further states that the Nepalese government depends on tourism as a major......

Words: 3898 - Pages: 16

Tourism

...GOVERNMENT OF INDIA MINISTRY OF TOURISM & CULTURE DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION FINAL REPORT ON 20 YEAR PERSPECTIVE PLAN FOR DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN MAHARASHTRA MARCH 2003 ΑΒΧ DALAL MOTT MACDONALD (FORMERLY DALAL CONSULTANTS & ENGINEERS LIMITED) Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Ministry of Tourism & Culture C-1, Hutments, Dalhousie Road New Delhi – 110 001 India Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra March 2003 Dalal Consultants & Engineers Limited Sarojini House 6 Bhagwan Dass Road New Delhi 110 001 India Tel: (011)-3389386, 3383521. 1441/Maharashtra/A/18 July 2002 C:\websiteadd\pplan\maharashtra\Vol 1\Executive Summary Final.doc/01 Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra ssue and Revision Record Rev Date Originator Checker Approver Description This document has been prepared for the titled project or named part thereof and should not be relied upon or used for any other project......

Words: 86033 - Pages: 345

Responsible Tourism

...to achieving economic sustainability for tourism in (i.e. California and Giants Causeway) is maximising the economic retention of tourist spending in your local economy. The sustainable tourism businesses need to develop strategies that are capable of meeting the long-term economic needs and aspirations of the local community. If the communities are engaged by tourism organisations as stakeholders in tourism, and economic partners in the tourism industry, this will actively support local tourism businesses. Tourism is a rapidly growing industry and has far-reaching economic and environmental impact across the destinations; hence, if tourism is an important source of local employment and a significant buyer of local goods and services, residents are more likely to be supportive. The business operators and local communities need to work together to maximise local economic benefits as well as the positive impacts of destinations. The possible strategies to use to manage responsible tourism are, seeking out ways to include local service providers and producers in your business, encourage your local business suppliers to develop sustainable goods and services that reflect local nature, history and culture. Widening access to facilities: One of the key challenges for Responsible Tourism is to broaden access. The local governors would need to approach their responsible side to the tourism facilities to make it more sustainable and using tourism to make better places for people to......

Words: 2892 - Pages: 12

Undergraduates' Perceptions of Tourism and Hospitality as a Career Choice

...Undergraduates' Perceptions of Tourism and Hospitality as a Career Choice Scott A. Richardson Griffith University Gold Coast, Australia E-mail: scott.richardson@griffith.edu.au ABSTRACT This study explored undergraduate tourism and hospitality student’s views of the industry as a career choice. Three hundred and seventy-nine tourism and hospitality students, from eight Australian institutions, completed a questionnaire rating the importance of twenty factors in influencing their choice of career, and then the extent to which they thought tourism and hospitality, as a career, offers these factors. A number of factors have been identified as being significantly different. From the results it is clear that students generally do not believe that a career in tourism and hospitality will offer them the factors that they find important. Key Words: Career choice, Undergraduates, Perceptions, Tourism, Hospitality INTRODUCTION The tourism and hospitality industry worldwide, and in Australia in particular, has been confronted with the problem of attracting and retaining quality employees which has lead to a shortage of skilled personnel to staff the ever-growing number of tourism and hospitality businesses (Andorka, 1996; Bonn & Forbringer, 1992; Breiter, 1991; Deery & Shaw, 1999; Dermady & Holloway, 1998; Emenheiser, Clay, & Palakurthi, 1998; Ferris, Berkson, & Harris, 2002; Freeland, 2000; Heraty & Morley, 1998; Hinkin & Tracey, 2000; McDermid, 1996; Powell, 1999; Tourism Division,......

Words: 6459 - Pages: 26

Tourism

...Overall tourism in Sri lanka Sri Lanka has always been a tourist destination. The number of tourists visiting to the Sri lanka has been consistently increasing rapidly in past few years and the countries of Asia and the Pacific now receive more visitors than any region, other than Europe. With the expansion of tourism, the region captured nearly one quarter of total global tourist arrivals in 2013. The number of tourists has increased in every country (for which data are available) of Asia and the Pacific in the 10 years from 2004 to 2013 Source –Tourism Research Today, Sri Lanka offers leisure and business travellers a spectrum of attractions. The commercial cities, Colombo, Kurunegala and Kandy offer business travellers an array of business opportunities and trade options. The sandy white beaches and attractive underwater life that surrounds the island, gives its visitors a chance to unwind and relax in a warm and comfortable setting. The beautiful rain forests, mountain ranges and scenic plantations can be visited within a few hours (approx. 4-5 hours travel time), and visitors can also visit the wildlife sanctuaries that are located in this small miracle. Source - 2012 annual statistical report by SLTDA According to the above mentioned graph, in 2012 lot of tourists were come to sri lanka for pleasure. Second and third places were taking for Visting friends &......

Words: 1857 - Pages: 8

Tourism

...of the viewers which in turn creates a negative impact on tourism ________because it deters them from visiting the area causing hige loss to the Queensland economy . In order to reduce the impact on the negativity caused by the media on the damages, it’s important to have ------------------respond_____________. disasters which can deter tourism from visiting the region by creating a negative perception in their mind that it’s not the right time and safe place to visit at the moment. The negative reporting of the damages caused by the cyclones have caused a potential loss to Queensland’s economics for tourism is one of the four pillars. Affected the tourism industry. Important that Tourism Queensland efficiently uses the money it has to gain maximum return as over ‘$590 million’ had been lost already. Important to plan and come up with a strategy that would achieve great benefits for the industry. The most commonly used tactics to bring back Slogan and images that shows the___________of Queensland that helps. According to the case study there have been an influx of a new target market, the Chinese people. Great opportunity to create campaigns to attract their attention. Include Chinese language in their ads in order to make them feel special. Chinese people are big spenders. In order to reduce the negative images created by the media, it is important to ‘get the truth’ out and reduce the declining number of tourism visiting the area or lure them back to the region.......

Words: 1480 - Pages: 6

Tourism of Switzerland

...Project About: “ Travel And Tourism of Switzerland” Flag: It may be hard to believe but the famous white cross on a red background has only been the national flag of Switzerland since the 19th century. The origins of the flag, though, date back to 1339 and the historic Battle of Laupen, when Confederate soldiers began using the white cross as their field sign. History: Switzerland evolved over many centuries from a loose alliance of small self-governing towns and states, beginning with the confederation of Uri, Schwyz and Nidwalden in 1291, to a fully-fledged federal state of 26 cantons. Despite periods of political, social and religious unrest, unity prevailed in the Old Swiss Confederacy. However, the French invasion of 1798 was to be a turning point in the country’s history, ushering in the first of several changes in government – the short-lived Helvetic Republic – that would continue until 1848. The birth of modern-day Switzerland was accompanied by the creation of a federal constitution that laid the permanent foundations for national cohesion and the pursuit of the common good, while upholding the country’s cultural and linguistic diversity Much of Switzerland’s landscape is covered by mountains – apparently inhospitable terrain for human habitation. And yet the routes across the Alpine and Jura mountain passes have brought in people and goods since prehistoric times. The Swiss Plateau, which stretches from Lake......

Words: 10781 - Pages: 44

Rock of Ages

...Business Chad Douglas, Events Manager, Tourism Kelowna December 2, 2014 Executive Summary Rock of the Ages Music Festival is a brand new festival designed for Tourism Kelowna. The purpose of the music festival is to bring together like-minded individuals who appreciate the rock music genre to celebrate its evolution. Rock of the Ages music festival will host many rock bands, or their tributes, from the early 50’s to today. The festival will be three days during August 14th, 15th and 16th in 2016 with two stages along the waterfront. The music will progress from older to newer rock music. Each day will have a different theme to match the age of the music playing that day. An event brief describes what the event will look like from a customer’s perspective. In the first year of operation, Rock of the Ages expects 5,000 attendees and 20+ rock bands. The music festival will have a revenue stream from ticket sales, sponsors, merchandise, space slips (vendors), alcoholic beverages, VIP experiences, parking and transportation. Rock of the Ages has six major competitors in Canada: Centre of Gravity, NXNE, Sled Island, Osheaga, Boonstock, and Heavy Montreal. Rock of the Ages marketing goals for 2016 are to: Sell-out 5,000 tickets; Ensure at least 4,500 (90%) of attendees are from Canada; Sell 70% of tickets by April 30, 2016; Reach 20,000 people via IMC efforts by April 15, 2016; and to Ensure 85% of attendees are satisfied with Rock of the Ages. The population......

Words: 15225 - Pages: 61

Tourism

...Topic: Heritage management (manage visitors. services. safeguarding built heritage. from tourism point of view Introduction Tourism is a major industry and strong economic vehicle that makes a significant contribution to overall national economy. (Nicolette de Sausmarez, 2007) Tourism for many individuals is about enjoyment and having fun, for governments tourism is generator of important foreign exchange and job creator for allied industries. Tourist industry has a major impact on host country’s civil society and social landscape. Tourism provides economic benefits and influences the local residents in many other ways as well (Oui, 2005). Tourists are exposed to local politics implicitly by being exposed to conditions that are present for local residents. Only countries with safe and stable image draw tourists in abandon, so in other ways increasing levels of tourists imply an endorsements of concerned location’s ambient environment. Political regimes are indirectly bolstered by tourists, therefore tourism not only aids in economic development but for international support of governmental policies (Oui, 2005). In case of a crisis or disaster, economy is disturbed and livelihood of many may be affected. Crisis indicators may be useful in highlighting areas of concern and minimize affects on tourism. The damage to tourist destination may be substantial, as in the case of SARS outbreak or Bali bombings and full recovery may take a significant time and effort. Crisis......

Words: 2740 - Pages: 11

The Bold Type | djyaakovdovrat | Seringai