Sociology of Health

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Submitted By mdusoye95
Words 2525
Pages 11
In this essay, my aims are to explain the definition of health, contrasted with a positive definition, such as that provided by the ‘World Health Organisation' (WHO) in 1974, with its positive and negative concept of health and the definition of disease and its connection to the social model. It will then be followed by the study of Mildred Blaxter (1990). I will also be explaining the definition of the ‘sick role' which was introduced by Talcott Parsons, with its positive and negative effects on the society. Following by an explanation of the doctor-patient relationship with the theory of the functionalist approach by Barber (1963) and by also critically evaluating ways in which the medical profession exercises social control as well as their contribution to ill health and their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, I will analyse the key issues relating to the political economy of the health industry.
Over the year's sociologist have tried to come up with a good definition of health, however, they were all elusive. According to the ‘World Health Organisations' (WHO) (1946), good health meant "Health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity" its definition was seen as a positive concept as it focused not only on being free from any diseases but it emphasised in a mixture of physical, mental, emotional and social well-being, this was seen to be so complete but yet unachievable. The negative concept of health is opposed to a positive concept of health, it was defined as ‘the absence of disease’ this focused more on the physical well-being, therefore it was said that if one does not have any disease they would be defined as completely healthy. In the health and social care sectors, the care professionals usually adopt a different approach to care and support and this approach is called the holistic…...

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