Soft Power in China and India

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Submitted By blondie227
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Soft power refers to the ability of a nation to obtain outcomes that it desires through persuasion and more notably, attraction. Conversely, hard power refers to power obtained through coercion. Through various methods, India and China are two nations that have experienced an extreme increase in their position as soft powers.

China has provided an attractive model for many other nations by serving as proof that modernization and westernization are not synonymous. The nation’s relationship focused culture and their ability to remain focused solely on business relationships and stay segregated from the governmental practices of their international partners adds to the attractiveness for some nations. Additionally, Confucius Institutes located around the world contribute to linguistic, historical, and cultural awareness.

India also has a rich culture of which awareness is promoted through cultural centers around the world. It’s widespread influence can be depicted through the success of Indian cuisine, technology, Bollywood, and even yoga practices. India has transformed into a modernized democracy, attracting much attention through its large pool of English speaking workers in combination with its high-tech information technology abilities. These qualities have given rise to the expanding Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) industry in India. This industry has allowed for the increase of India’s confidence in the global arena and has provided a starting point for further expansion and partnerships. Additionally, it has greatly contributed to India’s quickly growing economy.

Overall, there is something to be learned from watching the expansion of China and India as soft powers. Business and business practices throughout the world will experience the effects of this power through partnerships fostering cultural exchange and economic investments. Western countries…...

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