The Peloponnesian War

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The Peloponnesian War By definition The Peloponnesian War was a Greek civil war between two Greek allies in the Persian war; Athens and Sparta. The Persian war was a war fought between the Persians and the Greeks; these two Greek city states fought together to successfully defeat Persia. Many believe tensions arouse between Athens and Sparta during the Persian war due to opposing war tactics; quite simply they did not trust one another. This led to Athens and Sparta forming allies after the Persian war, Athens formed the Delian league while Sparta formed the Peloponnesian league. The Delian league funded their own naval army to guard and protect the Aegean from invasions from the Persians; this ultimately created a very powerful Athenian navy and Athenian empire. The first undeclared flames of war was when Sparta’s main ally, Corinth invaded Attica. Athens then taking precautions formed what is known as the long walls, which enclosed and connected Athens capital to its ports, which meant land based armies had little chances of starting war on Athens soil. This action sent fear and suspicions to Greek city states especially Corinth. Corinth was very important in commercial trade because it linked northern and southern Greece. The first outbreak of real conflict was when the Athenian navy dispatched a fleet to assist Egyptian rebels escape the Persian Empire. Rebellions in Athens then broke out, which led to Sparta invading Attica. A treaty known as the Thirty Years Peace was formed to prevent an official war between Athens and Sparta. Years went by before the treaty defected and Corinth declared Athens with committing an act of war. The act of war began when Corcyra seeked assistance from Athens during their battle with Corinth. Corinth then reached out to the Peloponnesian league which resulted in Thebes attacking Platea whom was an Athenian Ally. Now the war has…...

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