The Whaler

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Submitted By chrisserbisser
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The Whaler
The Irish short story “The Whaler” introduces us to the tale of a whaler’s and a young boy’s meeting, whereby the author uses flashbacks to introduce different themes, such as; growing up - the progress of becoming an adult rather than just a naive boy.
The setting of the story is in Ireland, on the top of a hill with fields surrounding it (p. 1 l. 1-2), not a completely deserted hill, but within sight of town (p. 4 l. 154-155). Presumably, a small town, since the town was too small for the Whaler (p. 1 l. 8), besides that, everybody seems to know each other, the Whaler and narrator know about one another, and they both know about Mrs. Early.
The short story is the flashback of a man, who remembers his first, and only, meeting with his idol, therefore, the setting is not present time. The flashback appears, firstly, by this short story being written in past tense, pointing out it already happened, which the narrator gives us a slight, yet subtle, hint of; “The idol of my young imagination.” (p. 1 l. 6).
This narrator, is not only telling the story, but reliving it, due to the flashback. The narrator is first person, and uses I quite often. The narrator is the boy, whom we follow during the short story. He’s remembering, when he met his idol, a moment in his life, which has had great significance, and has left a mark on him.
During the short story, and the flashback we are able to extract that the narrator, firstly, is a young admirer, and fan of the Whaler (p.1 l. 6-7), he thinks the Whaler is, nothing less but, a hero. Not only, does he consider the Whaler a hero, he, also knows a lot about the Whaler, and his travels. The narrator knows where he has been (p. 1 l. 8-11). He has read books about whaling (p. 1 l. 12), so the narrator, also, has knowledge about his line of work. A very passionate person, when it comes to things he cares about, it…...

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