United States Isolation Policy

In: Historical Events

Submitted By AndreaM
Words 601
Pages 3
The US foreign isolation policy consists on focusing the interest in the internal affairs of the country in search of prosperity, and to ensure safety. It was against of making alliance with other nations, or the participation in international conflicts outside the United States (United States History, n.d.). The US Isolation policy started during the presidency of G. Washington, who placed it in his Farewell Address. Later on, in 1823, Monroe established the Monroe Doctrine, which shared the same ideology as Washington (United States History, n.d.). However, when the Democratic party took the presidency of US failed in her aim of making the nation a protector of the world’s peace and democracy, which gave the power to the Republican party of reestablish the distrusted Isolation policy. When Woodrow Wilson entered to power, who was from the Democratic party, and this policy changed. He distrusted the Neutral policy, and took US into the First World War in order to “make the world safe for democracy”. He thought that it was a responsibility of the US to aimed it (The White House, n.d.). Nonetheless, because the great number of american soldiers dead casualties during the war, economic depression in an international level, and the need for increase attention to internal/domestic problems led the Republicans to argue against Wilson’s desire of enter into the the Covenant of the League of Nations (US Department of State: Office of the Historian, n.d.). Moreover, after the WWI, the Congress reject to be part of the League of Nations. This decision was supported by wide part of the American society, who was shocked by the destruction that the WWI caused. In order to preserve its internal balance, with the Isolation policy, US government imposed taxes in foreign goods. Moreover, started restricting and controlling the number of immigrants that were entered into…...

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