Unocal in Burma

In: Social Issues

Submitted By Chloe12032013
Words 1049
Pages 5
While reading this case, “Unocal in Burma”, I thought that there were human rights issues but there were also situations that I thought might have been beneficial to the residents. There were improvements in the country due to the companies that decided to invest in the Yadana project. I will analyze four approaches namely, utilitarian, rights, justice and caring and discuss my point of view in relation to the case.
Firstly, let us take a look at utilitarian approach in connection to Unocal and its Partners decision to invest in the Yadana Field project. Burma is a poor country and has been dealing with poverty for years now. Unocal and the other companies see that if they invest in this project there will be benefits for the companies but also for the people of Burma as well. Although it may be dangerous to transport gas above the ocean in a region where people live, the bigger picture would be how much people will be affected directed or if any at all verses how much revenue this would generate for the country along with benefits. This might be tricky since it is not possible to put a value or cost on someone’s life. Hence the greatest sum total of utility would be the revenue generated from the project allowing the government of the country fifteen percent of the stake, employment for the Burmese, improved health care, improvement in education, small business opportunities and new transportation infrastructure along with the profits for the company. Everyone has gained something.
Secondly, does this give the government of the country the right to make these decisions knowing that some of their resident might suffer? Although the outcome was beneficial for everyone, the people of Burma especially the minority ethnic group should have a voice in what happen in their region. Take for example someone who comes to your house and do not like where your couch is…...

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