What Was Lost

In: English and Literature

Submitted By Ingievv
Words 2037
Pages 9
What was lost

Book report by Ingrid van Veen

plot

There are three parts in the novel. It starts in 1984, when a 10-year old girl named Kate pretends to be a detective, her favourite playground the shopping centre Green Oaks. Kate is still upset about the loss of her father, and she believes that she does him proud with her work. Her partners in crime are Adrian, the 22 year old son of a newsagent and Mickey, a plush monkey who is taken wherever Kate goes. Then Kate mysteriously disappears and Adrian is the prime-suspect as he was the last one who had seen her. He also vanishes, the mystery never solved.

20 years later

Security guard Kurt witnesses a young girl wandering around the shopping centre of Green Oaks at night. However, when he tries to find her, she is nowhere to be seen. He works as a security guard at Green Oaks, and basically his life consists of his work, as he has nothing else to live for. Lisa works at Your Music and considers her life miserable. She has lost her brother, who disappeared after he was accused of being involved in the disappearance of Kate Meaney. For 20 years there had been no lead in the case and Kate was never found.
A string of strange events and lost memories tie together the lives of many people, all somehow connected to the case of Kate Meaney. A suicide, a memory from years ago, a lost brother and a hidden secret eventually lead to the closure of a case shrouded in mysteries for so long.

Setting: Time

The story begins in 1984, when the main character Kate is only 10 years old. You can tell by the page that says:

“1984 – Falcon Investigations”
(O'Flynn, 2007, p. 1)

In the '80s everything was different than it is now. There was no internet as we know it now, people thought differently, there were other values, things we're just different than it is now in the world we live in. 20 years…...

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