Why Shared Moral Values by Team Players of the Firm Reduce Conflict and Dependency That Occurs Due to Bounded Rationality and Opportunistic Behavior.

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Why shared moral values by team players of the firm reduce conflict and dependency that occurs due to bounded rationality and opportunistic behavior.

Term paper for the module “Ethics, Compliance, and Alternative Dispute Resolution Mechanisms” at Hamburg School of Business Administration Prof. Dr. Christoph Niehus

Simon Rybach Langenfelder Damm 90 22525 Hamburg Tel.: 0173/ 2196726 simon@rybach.de Matriculation number: 1896 MBA HL 2013

Charles Darwin described 1871 that “[…] an advancement in the standard of morality […] will certainly give an immense advantage to one tribe over another. A tribe including many members who, from possessing in a high degree the spirit of patriotism, fidelity, obedience, courage, and sympathy, were always ready to aid one another, and to sacrifice themselves for the common good, would be victorious over most other tribes” (Darwin, 1871/1981). His work about the antecedent of men pointed out to the importance of shared moral values as an element for the survival of certain tribes. These findings in the context of evolution are still valid and appropriate in the context of building high productivity teams in firms as a competitive advantage. Organizations have to cope with today’s complexity of a global business environment. Meeting this challenge requires a high degree of flexibility in companies in order to adapt to constantly, rapidly changing external factors. The globalization forces companies to develop new organizational structures to deal with the competitive pressure by improving their quality and efficiency. Teams, defined as “a small group of people with complementary skills who are committed to a common purpose, performance goals, and approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable” (Katzenbach and Smith, 1993), have been considered for the last forty years to be an integral part of organizational…...

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